Century essay microhistorical nineteenth other quebec religion society

On the more "genteel" end of Eastern Townships society, what to make of the Anglican clergyman James Reid or the English emigrant Lucy Peel, whose lives and writings fit uneasily into the conventional private-public dichotomy and rigid system of gender roles that placed such a high value on female domesticity?

While it might be objected that the terrain of microhistory is the local and by implication unrepresentative and signals a retreat into the anecdotal or antiquarian, Little is adamant that this approach not be seen as simply a "case study.

The writings of Anglican clergyman James Reid and the diary of gentlewoman Lucy Peel emphasize the primacy of male domesticity and piety in the Christian home, along with a more public and cultured sociability of women than was previously imagined.

The thematic elements in the second half of the collection are more institutional, although religion remains an underlying focal point in all four articles. Fortunately, The Other Quebec is an excellent source of microhistory, demonstrating the varieties and vagaries of religious experience in the nineteenth century, and how Protestant religion emerged as a crucial social force in the Eastern Townships.

What success these projects enjoyed was frequently determined "from below" as state officials needed to temporize, negotiate with, and even incorporate the values of their clients in extending their authority.

After all, Little has spent his academic career writing about the nineteenth-century Eastern Townships, an Anglo-Protestant enclave within a predominantly francophone and Catholic society.

The Other Quebec: Microhistorical Essays on Nineteenth-Century Religion and Society

Darren Ferry The Other Quebec: Perhaps more significantly this edited collection of essays challenges the historical profession to recognize religion as a considerable social and cultural influence in nineteenth-century rural society.

The lack of fit between these value systems, argues Little, directs historians to a closer consideration of the persistent role played by evangelical religion as a system of communitarian rather than individualistic values that exerted a key influence, especially in the decades between andover the emergence of the ideologies and practices of liberal society in Canada.

View freely available titles: Consider an individual like Ralph Merry, an itinerant peddler and religious enthusiast. Viewed through the optic of microhistory and religious identities, however, this master narrative seems far more tenuous.

This study of the relationship between Marcus Child, a middle-class school inspector, and his constituency of Protestant farmers and artisans reveals that "reform" encompassed a terrain of shared values between the state and supposedly dominated subject populations.

The other Quebec : microhistorical essays on nineteenth-century religion and society

What emerges from this portrait of a religious radical is how popular religion and visionary quasi-mysticism differed completely from institutionalized belief systems of the Protestant churches in the district. University of Toronto Press, Conventionally, Canadian historians have taken the s as the benchmark of an emerging liberal capitalist modernity, characterized by rationality, the discipline of the market economy, the division between public and private which gave firm shape to gender identities by identifying men with work and women with home and domesticitythe emergence of a well-defined middle class based on industrial and commercial activity, and, finally, the intrusion of an increasingly competent state through systems of discipline that both produced and enforced these values.

Rather, Child often utilized persuasion and negotiation, rather than coercion, in furthering school reform among his agricultural constituency, a process duplicated by clergy-inspired temperance societies. The first half of the collection cuts across class and gender lines, and scrutinizes both the private and public religiosity of four families and how their religious practices and beliefs contributed to the fostering of domestic piety, class identity, gender formation, and economic behaviour.

Conventionally, the methodology of social history has been directed to elucidating broad social structures: Little uses a microhistorical method, focusing on individuals who left behind informative and revealing diaries or personal letters, including those of a religious ecstatic, an Anglican clergyman, a genteel Englishwoman, and an entrepreneur.

Here, unlike the old social history, which would characterize these values as "traditionalist" survivals in a modernizing society, Little clearly posits them as integral to notions of modernity that must be shaped by an historical awareness of flux, paradox, and ambiguity.

However, an emerging group of historians, of whom Little is one of the major figures, has in recent years grown impatient with this agenda, and in particular, with the conservative nature of old-style social history to discern the dynamic quality of relationships within a given historical context.

How then to treat this body of evidence? The reader is first introduced to the millenarian world of Ralph Merry, an itinerant tinware peddler, occasional farmer, and religious ecstatic. Little provides an intimate look at both a time and a place of singular importance and unique character in Canadian history.

It is an enclave whose largely rural character is hardly propitious terrain for the exploration of the dynamics of industrial capitalism and the emergence of well-defined modern class and gender identities, which has formed the staple of so much writing in social history over the past three decades.

The evidence presented in these essays is a resounding yes. And, to social historians who, in recent years, have deployed the theories of Michel Foucault to posit "social reform" in terms of the rapid rise of an intrusive centralizing state as an instrument of social discipline in liberal societies, Little presents an illuminating study.

The common thread that unifies these essays is Protestant religion, although Little is clear that the volume does not explore the churches as institutions, structures of religious ideas, or the evolving nature of religious practices.

You are not currently authenticated. The collection examines the role and influence of religion in the Eastern Townships. The immediate reaction of historians writing within the mainstream of Canadian social history would be to discount this latest volume of essays by J.

In the lives of both these individuals, male domesticity and moral leadership stood at the center of both an ideology of the Christian family and a set of lived relationships within the family.

Little makes a persuasive case in urging historians toward microhistory, a practice that arose on the margins of social history and was especially favored by scholars of early modern Europe.

In exploring the dynamics of religion and society among the anglophone Protestant minority in the Eastern Townships, Little employs the methodology of microhistory, an examination of select personal papers such as letters, diaries, and personal accounts.

University of Toronto Press, Rather, the author poses a more fundamental issue:The Other Quebec: Microhistorical Essays on Nineteenth-Century Religion and Society. By J.I. Little. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, xii + pp.

$ cloth; $ paper. The immediate reaction of historians writing within the mainstream of Canadian social history would be to. The Other Quebec: Microhistorical Essays on Nineteenth-Century Religion and Society (Heritage) [J.I. Little] on mint-body.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Eastern Townships region of southwestern Quebec is an area of unique culture and history. This item: The Other Quebec: Microhistorical Essays on Nineteenth-Century Religion and Society (Heritage) Set up a giveaway There's a problem loading this menu right now.

The publication of The Other Quebec not only solidifies J.I. Little's position as the foremost historian of Quebec's Eastern Townships.

Perhaps more significantly this edited collection of essays challenges the historical profession to recognize religion as a considerable social and cultural influence in nineteenth-century rural society.

The other Quebec: microhistorical essays on nineteenth-century religion and society. [J I Little] -- "In The Other Quebec, J.I.

Little - one of the foremost scholars on the Eastern Townships and on rural society in Canada - assembles seven of his essays and one by Marguerite Van Die on this unique.

The Other Quebecexplores some of the complex ways that religious institutions and beliefs affected the rural societies in which the majority of Canadians still lived in the nineteenth century. eISBN:

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Century essay microhistorical nineteenth other quebec religion society
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